Would you still go out if you could see it? COVID-19

Posted on Uncategorized April 8, 2020 by Vittorio Bonomi

Colleagues in the office practicing alternative greeting for safety and protection during COVID-19

Colleagues in the office practicing alternative greeting for safety and protection during COVID-19

Coronaviruses are a large family of viruses that are common in people and many different species of animals, including camels, cattle, cats, and bats. Rarely, animal coronaviruses can infect people and then spread between people such as with MERS-CoV, SARS-CoV, and now with this new virus (named SARS-CoV-2).  The virus has been called “SARS-CoV-2,” and the disease it causes has been named “coronavirus disease 2019” (abbreviated “COVID-19”).
In COVID-19, 'CO' stands for 'corona,' 'VI' for 'virus,' and 'the D' for the disease. Formerly, this disease was referred to as “2019 novel coronavirus” or “2019-nCoV”. There are many types of human coronaviruses, including some that commonly cause mild upper-respiratory tract illnesses.
What is the recovery time for the coronavirus disease?
Using available preliminary data, the median time from onset to clinical recovery for mild cases is approximately 2 weeks and is 3-6 weeks for patients with the severe or critical disease.


Tracking COVID-19 cases in the US-Since January, novel coronavirus has spread to nearly every state and territory  By Sergio Hernandez, Sean O’Key, Amanda Watts, Byron Manley, and Henrik Pettersson, CNN, Last updated: April 6, 2020, at 10:00 a.m. ET

Update as of April 6, 2020, at 10:00 am EST
Cases = 337,971
Deaths = 9,654
•    Source: Johns Hopkins University Center for Systems Science and Engineering

Since January, health authorities have identified more than 337,000 COVID-19 cases throughout the United States. New York has become the epicenter of the country’s outbreak, with 123,160 confirmed cases and 4,159 deaths so far. When adjusted for population, that translates to roughly 633 known cases and 21 deaths for every 100,000 residents.


How do I prevent and prepare for COVID-19?
There is currently no vaccine to prevent coronavirus disease in 2019 (COVID-19). The best way to prevent illness is to avoid being exposed to the virus (and avoid exposing other people).

Here’s how:

Practice social distancing:
    1. If you are around other people, keep 6 feet between you when possible. Avoid hugs, handshakes, large gatherings, and close quarters.
    2. Why? The virus is thought to spread mainly from person-to-person.
    3. When someone coughs or sneezes, they spray small liquid droplets from their nose or mouth, which may contain the virus.
    4. If you are too close, you can breathe in the droplets, including the coronavirus, if the person coughing has the disease.
Clean your hands often:
    1. Wash your hands frequently with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. Or use a hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol.
    2. Clean your hands, especially after you have been in a public place, or after blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing.
    3. Why? Washing your hands with soap and water or using alcohol-based hand sanitizer kills viruses that may be on your hands.
Avoid touching eyes, nose & mouth:
    1. Why? Hands touch many surfaces and can pick up viruses. Once contaminated, hands can transfer the virus to your eyes, nose, or mouth.
Cover coughs & sneezes:
    1. Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when you cough or sneeze or use the inside of your elbow. Throw used tissues in the trash.
    2. Why? Droplets spread the virus. By following good respiratory hygiene, you protect the people around you from viruses such as cold, flu, and COVID-19.
Clean and disinfect "high touched" surfaces:
    1. Clean AND disinfect frequently touched surfaces daily. This includes tables, doorknobs, light switches, countertops, handles, desks, phones, keyboards, toilets, faucets, and sinks.
    2. If surfaces are dirty, first clean with detergent or soap and water and then disinfect. The most common EPA-registered household disinfectants, diluted household bleach solutions, and alcohol solutions with at least 70% alcohol will work. See how to make a bleach solution if disinfectants are not available.
What do I do if I think I was exposed to coronavirus?
Some people are at higher risk of getting very sick from COVID-19. Here’s what to do if you think you may have been exposed to coronavirus.


Watch for symptoms:
Reported illnesses have ranged from mild symptoms to severe disease and death for confirmed COVID-19 cases. These symptoms may appear 2–14 days after exposure.
    1. Fever (100.4°F/38°C or higher)
    2. Cough
    3. Shortness of breath
If you develop these emergency warning signs for COVID-19, get medical attention immediately.
      1. Difficulty breathing or shortness of breath
      2. Persistent pain or pressure in the chest
      3. New confusion or inability to arouse
      4. Bluish lips or face
Call before you go:
      1. Call your doctor or your County Health Department if you think you have been exposed to COVID-19 and develop a fever and symptoms, such as cough or difficulty breathing.
      2. Tell them about your symptoms and your exposure. They will decide whether you need to be tested.
      3. Consult your health care provider for any other symptoms that are severe or concerning.
What do I do if I’m sick?
    1. If you think you may have been exposed to COVID-19 and show symptoms, contact your healthcare provider or County Health Department immediately
    2. There is no specific antiviral treatment recommended for COVID-19.
    3. If you are sick with a fever (100.4°F/38°C or higher) or cough, have trouble breathing, or suspect you have COVID-19, here’s how to help prevent the disease from spreading to people in your home and community.
Self-isolate at home:
    1. If you’re mildly ill with COVID-19, isolate at home during the illness. You should restrict activities outside your home, except for getting medical care.
    2. Do not go to work, school or public areas. Avoid using public transportation, ride-sharing, or taxis.
Stay away from others:
    1. As much as possible, stay in a specific room and away from other people in your home. Use a separate bathroom, if available.
    2. Avoid all contact with pets and other animals while you are sick with COVID-19, just like you would around other people.
    3. Why? Although there have not been reports of pets or other animals becoming sick with COVID-19, it is still recommended that people infected with COVID-19 limit contact with animals until more information is known about the virus. If you must care for your pet or be around animals while you are sick, wash your hands before and after you interact with pets and wear a facemask.
Wear a facemask if you are sick:
    1. If you are sick, wear a facemask around other people.
    2. Why? When someone coughs or sneezes, they spray small liquid droplets from their nose or mouth, which may contain the virus. If you are not able to wear a facemask (for example, because it causes trouble breathing), then cover your coughs and sneezes. People caring for you should wear a facemask around you.
    3. If you are NOT sick, do not wear a facemask unless you are caring for someone who is sick (and they are not able to wear a facemask).
    4. Why? Facemasks may be in short supply, and they should be saved for caregivers and people who are sick.
Practice everyday habits to prevent spreading COVID-19:

See the best ways to avoid exposing other people to COVID-19.
    1. Watch for symptoms
    2. Reported illnesses have ranged from mild symptoms to severe illness and death for confirmed coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) cases.
    3. These symptoms may appear 2-14 days after exposure(based on the incubation period of MERS-CoV viruses).
    4. Fever
    5. Cough
    6. Shortness of breath
When to Seek Medical Attention:

If you develop emergency warning signs for COVID-19 get, medical attention immediately. Emergency warning signs include*:
      1. Trouble breathing
    1. Persistent pain or pressure in the chest
    2. New confusion or inability to arouse
    3. Bluish lips or face
*This list is not all-inclusive. Please consult your medical provider for any other symptoms that are severe or concerning.


People Who Are at Higher Risk:
    1. COVID-19 is a new disease, and there is limited information regarding risk factors for severe disease.
    2. Based on currently available information and clinical expertise, older adults and people of any age who have serious underlying medical conditions might be at higher risk for severe illness from COVID-19.
    3. Older adults, 65 years and older, are at higher risk for severe illness. COVID-19 is a new disease, and we are learning more about it every day.
What you can do:
    1. Stay home.
    2. Wash your hands
    3. Avoid close contact(6 feet, which is about two arm lengths) with people who are sick.
    4. Clean and disinfect frequently touched services.
    5. Avoid all cruise travel and non-essential air travel.
    6. Call your healthcare professional if you have concerns about COVID-19
COVID-19 is a new disease, and there is limited information regarding risk factors for severe disease. Based on currently available information and clinical expertise, older adults and people of any age who have serious underlying medical conditions might be at higher risk for severe illness from COVID-19.



Based on what we know now, those at high-risk for severe illness from COVID-19 are:
    1. People 65 years and older
    2. People who live in a nursing home or long-term care facility
    3. People with moderate to severe asthma may be at higher risk of getting very sick from COVID-19.  COVID-19 can affect your respiratory tract (nose, throat, lungs), cause an asthma attack, and possibly lead to pneumonia and acute respiratory disease.
Treatment:
    1. There is currently no specific treatment for or vaccine to prevent COVID-19.  The best way to prevent illness is to avoid being exposed to this virus.
Prepare for COVID-19:
    1. Stock up on supplies.
    2. Take everyday precautions to keep space between yourself and others.
    3. When you go out in public, keep away from others who are sick.
    4. Clean your hands often by washing with soap and water or using an alcohol-based hand sanitizer.
    5. Avoid crowds and people who are sick.
    6. Avoid cruise travel and non-essential air travel.
    7. During a COVID-19 outbreak in your community, stay home as much as possible to further reduce your risk of being exposed.
    8. If someone in your home is sick, have them stay away from the rest of the household to reduce the risk of spreading the virus in your home.
    9. Avoid sharing personal household items such as cups and towels.
Follow your Asthma Action Plan:
    1. Keep your asthma under control by following your asthma action plan.
    2. Continue your current medications, including any inhalers with steroids in them (“steroids” is another word for corticosteroids).
    3. Don’t stop any medications or change your asthma treatment plan without talking to your healthcare provider.
    4. Discuss any concerns about your treatment with your healthcare provider.
    5. Talk to your healthcare provider, insurer, and pharmacist about creating an emergency supply of prescription medications, such as asthma inhalers. Make sure that you have 30 days of non-prescription medications and supplies on hand, too, in case you need to stay home for a long time.
    6. Know how to use your inhaler.
    7. Avoid your asthma triggers.
    8. As more cases of COVID-19 are discovered, and our communities take action to combat the spread of disease, it is natural for some people to feel concerned or stressed. Strong emotions can trigger an asthma attack. Take steps to help yourself cope with stress and anxiety.
Clean and disinfect things you or your family touch frequently:
    • If possible, have someone who doesn’t have asthma do the cleaning and disinfecting. When they use cleaning and disinfecting products, have them:
      1. Make sure that people with asthma are not in the room.
      2. Minimize the use of disinfectants that can cause an asthma attack.
      3. Open windows or doors and use a fan that blows air outdoors.
      4. Clean and disinfect surfaces like phones, remotes, tables, doorknobs, light switches, countertops, handles, desks, keyboards, toilets, faucets, and sinks daily.
      5. Always follow the instructions on the product label.
CDC Issues Domestic Travel Advisory for New York, New Jersey, and Connecticut:
    • The CDC urges residents of New York, New Jersey, and Connecticut to refrain from non-essential domestic travel for 14 days effective immediately.  This Domestic Travel Advisory does not apply to employees of critical infrastructure industries, including but not limited to trucking, public health professionals, financial services, and food supply.  These employees of critical infrastructure, as defined by the Department of Homeland Security (https://www.cisa.gov/publication/guidance-essential-critical-infrastructure-workforceexternal icon) have a special responsibility to maintain a normal work schedule.  The Governors of New York, New Jersey, and Connecticut will have full discretion to implement this Domestic Travel Advisory.
Clean and disinfect “high-touch” surfaces:
    1. Clean AND disinfect frequently touched surfaces daily. This includes tables, doorknobs, light switches, countertops, handles, desks, phones, keyboards, toilets, faucets, and sinks.
    2. If surfaces are dirty, first clean with detergent or soap and water, and then disinfect. The most common EPA-registered household disinfectants, diluted household bleach solutions, and alcohol solutions with at least 70% alcohol will work. See how to make a bleach solution if disinfectants are not available.
Financial Support Available:

  https://www.sba.gov/disaster-assistance/coronavirus-covid-19

The U.S. Small Business Administration is offering designated states and territories low-interest federal disaster loans for working capital to small businesses suffering substantial economic injury as a result of the Coronavirus (COVID-19). Upon a request received from a state’s or territory’s Governor, the SBA will issue under its own authority, as provided by the Coronavirus Preparedness and Response Supplemental Appropriations Act that was recently signed by the President, an
                

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Economic Injury Disaster Loan declaration.
    • Any such Economic Injury Disaster Loan assistance declaration issued by the SBA makes loans available statewide to small businesses and private, nonprofit organizations to help alleviate economic injury caused by the Coronavirus (COVID-19). This will apply to current and future disaster assistance declarations related to Coronavirus.
The SBA’s Office of Disaster Assistance will coordinate with the state’s or territory’s Governor to submit the request for Economic Injury Disaster Loan assistance.

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